Thursday, September 24, 2009

Upcoming events


Starts next Friday in Wellington, But this Sunday Auckland celebrations and events are happening. It is open to individuals or groups wanting to join in or support the world march. It would be great to see the Salvation Army participating.

Here's the link to the events that will be held, make sure to get along:

http://www.fusecreative.co.nz/worldmarch/join.html#2

I thought It'll be great to have a theme song and what better song than Michael Jackson's: Heal the world

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W61Q-EZ8R7M

Tuesday, September 22, 2009

Waitakere Says No to Pokies

Waitakere City Council Has just adopted Sinking Lid policy for the Gaming (Gambling ) Policy. With Much persuasian (4000 submissions) from waitakere city citizens, the council choose the Sinking lid out of the three options avalible- this means that no new licences can be granted, and when current licences expire they cannot be renewed (hence sinking lid). Justice is Near! sure it may take another 20 years for all of the pokie machines to disapear and/or the Supercity governing body could overturn the decision but the peoples voices have been heard. Now those who can vote to make such decisions know what we think. Also, as a community, we know what we think- this brings us together, for each others wellbeing and makes us stronger- together (the key word!)

See full article here- http://www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/news/article.cfm?c_id=1&objectid=10598761

Thursday, September 17, 2009

Cadbury's switch

Cadbury's switch to Fairtrade will make a difference to poor farmers
26 Aug 09

Cadbury’s decision to use Fairtrade cocoa in its popular dairy milk chocolate bars is a compelling example of the difference consumers have made to the plight of poor farmers in the developing world.

Chocolate lovers in the UK are already enjoying the guilt-free taste of Cadbury’s Fairtrade dairy milk bar, and Oxfam congratulates Cadbury in New Zealand and Australia for giving consumers more Fairtrade chocolate to choose from. When Kiwi shoppers buy a Fairtrade labelled product they are ensuring that producers and growers in the developing world get a fair price for their goods.

“It just goes to show how much power we have as consumers,” says Barry Coates, Oxfam New Zealand’s Executive Director. “For a major chocolate manufacturer like Cadbury to go Fairtrade is a real tribute to everyone who has been supporting the Fairtrade campaign globally. The more we ask for Fairtrade products, the more supermarkets, cafes and manufacturers will have to listen.”

Sales of Fairtrade Certified products including coffee, tea and chocolate reached NZ$10.5 million in 2008 – an increase of more than 50 per cent from 2007.

Cadbury’s switch to Fairtrade will triple the quantity of Fairtrade products available in New Zealand once the dairy milk bars reach the shelves by Easter next year. Cadbury’s move means than Fairtrade chocolate will be available in almost every supermarket and dairy across New Zealand.

“With the Fairtrade market in New Zealand booming, farmers can sell their coffee, tea and cocoa to New Zealand importers at a decent price, and as a result have income to support their families and communities. Oxfam is also working with New Zealand companies and producers in the Pacific to expand the range of Fairtrade products for New Zealanders to choose from.”

The Fairtrade movement has been one of the most powerful responses to the plight of producers in developing countries who have long been excluded from the benefits of international trade. An impressive 7.5 million people from 59 developing countries now benefit from the Fairtrade system.

“Cadbury is showing real leadership and we hope other New Zealand food manufacturers will follow suit. We will continue to encourage Cadbury and other chocolate manufacturers to source all of their ingredients for all of their chocolate from Fairtrade sources where available.“

Email cadbury to congratulate them but also email Whittakers to put the pressure on them to make the switch, here's the link:
http://www.oxfam.org.nz/index.asp?s1=what%20we%20do&s2=issues+we+work+on&s3=fair+trade&s4=take+action

Monday, September 14, 2009

Our Hope Is You'll Get Mad Enough To Do Something

I've been following invisible.tv invisiblepeople.tv's series of short video interviews with american homeless people.

Their byline is particularly poignant: "Caution: Some content may be offensive. Our hope is you'll get mad enough to do something." - applies to all issues of social justice, really.

Each person interviewed has a story. Each has a name.

Whilst I hope New Zealand's social welfare and health systems are better at catching, and helping, people with stories like these - it is a timely reminder of the real challenges faced by vulnerable people; even in comparatively wealthy societies like ours.

Challenging ...

cross-posted from GavinKnight.com

Thursday, September 10, 2009

CLEAN UP THE WORLD WEEKEND 2009



In 2009, the campaign's flagship event; Clean Up the World Weekend will be held from the 18 -20 of September.

This year, Clean Up the World wants to get 750 groups involved worldwide. Help us reach this goal and make a difference to our earth by registering your activity today, spreading the word and getting your friends, family and co-workers involved in this landmark campaign.

Getting involved is easy! Communities can conduct activities such as clean up events or organise environmental awareness raising activities. Groups, organisations, businesses and communities around the world unite and take action at a local level to address the global issue of climate change.
http://www.cleanuptheworld.org/en/Activities/clean-up-the-world-weekend-2009.html?gclid=CKCItJ3A5ZwCFSn6agodHRrFFg

http://www.knzbcleanupweek.co.nz/

Monday, September 7, 2009

Just a drink?


Alcohol has always been a hotly contested commodity. Diverse groups compete to control it, moderate it, prohibit it, or promote it. The Law Commission is currently fueling something of a national conversation to try and challenge come of our excessive drinking culture. Go to http://www.alac.org.nz/PastEvents_International.aspx to see Sir Geoffrey Palmer give a ten minute presentation of what the Law Commission is saying. What do you think of its recommendations? Who else have you noticed is trying to have a say?